Risk Considerations

Investment and Market Risk

An investment in the Fund’s common shares is subject to investment risk, including the possible loss of the entire principal amount invested. An investment in the Fund’s common shares represents an indirect investment in the portfolio of Senior Loans, Corporate Bonds and other securities and loans owned by the Fund, and the value of these securities and loans may fluctuate, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. For instance, as evidenced by the global economic downturn, the secondary markets for Senior Loans, Corporate Bonds and investments with similar economic characteristics (such as second lien loans and unsecured loans) can experience sudden and sharp price swings, which can be exacerbated by large or sustained sales by major investors in these markets, a high-profile default by a major borrower, movements in indices tied to these markets or related securities or investments, or a change in the market’s perception of Senior Loans and investments with similar economic characteristics (such as second lien loans and unsecured loans) and Corporate Bonds. At any point in time, an investment in the Fund’s common shares may be worth less than the original amount invested, even after taking into account distributions paid by the Fund, if any, and the ability of common shareholders to reinvest dividends. The Fund anticipates using leverage, which will magnify the Fund’s risks and, in turn, the risks to the Fund’s common shareholders.

Senior Loans Risk

The Senior Loans in which the Fund will invest will primarily be rated below investment grade, but may also be unrated and of comparable credit quality. As a result, the risks associated with such Senior Loans are generally similar to the risks of other below investment grade fixed income instruments, although Senior Loans are senior and typically secured in contrast to other below investment grade fixed income instruments, which are often subordinated or unsecured. Investments in below investment grade Senior Loans are considered speculative because of the credit risk of the Borrowers. Such Borrowers are more likely than investment grade Borrowers to default on their payments of interest and principal owed to the Fund, and such defaults could reduce the Fund’s net asset value and income distributions. An economic downturn would generally lead to a higher non-payment rate, and a Senior Loan may lose significant market value before a default occurs. Moreover, any specific collateral used to secure a Senior Loan may decline in value or become illiquid, which would adversely affect the Senior Loan’s value. Senior Loans are subject to a number of risks described elsewhere in this prospectus, including liquidity risk and the risk of investing in below investment grade fixed income instruments.

Senior Loans are subject to the risk of non-payment of scheduled interest or principal. Such non-payment would result in a reduction of income to the Fund, a reduction in the value of the investment and a potential decrease in the net asset value of the Fund. There can be no assurance that the liquidation of any collateral securing a Senior Loan would satisfy the Borrower’s obligation in the event of non-payment of scheduled interest or principal payments, whether when due or upon acceleration, or that the collateral could be liquidated, readily or otherwise. In the event of bankruptcy or insolvency of a Borrower, the Fund could experience delays or limitations with respect to its ability to realize the benefits of the collateral, if any, securing a Senior Loan. The collateral securing a Senior Loan, if any, may lose all or substantially all of its value in the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of a Borrower. Some Senior Loans are subject to the risk that a court, pursuant to fraudulent conveyance or other similar laws, could subordinate such Senior Loans to presently existing or future indebtedness of the Borrower or take other action detrimental to the holders of Senior Loans including, in certain circumstances, invalidating such Senior Loans or causing interest previously paid to be refunded to the Borrower. Additionally, a Senior Loan may be "primed" in bankruptcy, which reduces the ability of the holders of the Senior Loan to recover on the collateral. Priming takes place when a debtor in bankruptcy is allowed to incur additional indebtedness by the bankruptcy court and such indebtedness has a senior or pari passu lien with the debtor’s existing secured indebtedness, such as existing Senior Loans or secured Corporate Bonds.

There may be less readily available information about most Senior Loans and the Borrowers thereunder than is the case for many other types of securities, including securities issued in transactions registered under the Securities Act, or registered under the Exchange Act, and Borrowers subject to the periodic reporting requirements of Section 13 of the Exchange Act. Senior loans may be issued by companies that are not subject to SEC reporting requirements and these companies, therefore, do not file reports with the SEC that must comply with SEC form requirements and in addition are subject to a less stringent liability disclosure regime than companies subject to SEC reporting requirements. As a result, the Adviser will rely primarily on its own evaluation of a Borrower’s credit quality rather than on any available independent sources. Therefore, the Fund will be particularly dependent on the analytical abilities of the Adviser.

The secondary trading market for Senior Loans may be less liquid than the secondary trading market for registered investment grade debt securities. No active trading market may exist for certain Senior Loans, which may make it difficult to value them. Illiquidity and adverse market conditions may mean that the Fund may not be able to sell Senior Loans quickly or at a fair price. To the extent that a secondary market does exist for certain Senior Loans, the market for them may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods.

Senior Loans and other variable rate debt instruments are subject to the risk of payment defaults of scheduled interest or principal. Such payment defaults would result in a reduction of income to the Fund, a reduction in the value of the investment and a potential decrease in the net asset value of the Fund. Similarly, a sudden and significant increase in market interest rates may increase the risk of payment defaults and cause a decline in the value of these investments and in the Fund’s net asset value. Other factors (including, but not limited to, rating downgrades, credit deterioration, a large downward movement in stock prices, a disparity in supply and demand of certain securities or market conditions that reduce liquidity) can reduce the value of Senior Loans and other debt obligations, impairing the Fund’s net asset value.

Senior Loans are subject to legislative risk. If legislation or state or federal regulations impose additional requirements or restrictions on the ability of financial institutions to make loans, the availability of Senior Loans for investment by the Fund may be adversely affected. In addition, such requirements or restrictions could reduce or eliminate sources of financing for certain Borrowers. This would increase the risk of default. If legislation or federal or state regulations require financial institutions to increase their capital requirements this may cause financial institutions to dispose of Senior Loans that are considered highly levered transactions. Such sales could result in prices that, in the opinion of the Adviser, do not represent fair value. If the Fund attempts to sell a Senior Loan at a time when a financial institution is engaging in such a sale, the price the Fund could receive for the Senior Loan may be adversely affected.

The Fund expects to acquire Senior Loans primarily through assignments and, to a lesser extent, through participations. The purchaser of an assignment typically succeeds to all the rights and obligations of the assigning institution and becomes a lender under the credit agreement with respect to the debt obligation; however, the purchaser’s rights can be more restricted than those of the assigning institution, and the Fund may not be able to unilaterally enforce all rights and remedies under the loan and with regard to any associated collateral. In general, a participation is a contractual relationship only with the institution participating out the interest, not with the Borrower. Sellers of participations typically include banks, broker-dealers, other financial institutions and lending institutions. In purchasing participations, the Fund generally will have no right to enforce compliance by the Borrower with the terms of the loan agreement against the Borrower, and the Fund may not directly benefit from the collateral supporting the debt obligation in which it has purchased the participation. As a result, (i) the Fund will be exposed to the credit risk of both the Borrower and the institution selling the participation and (ii) both the Borrower and the institution selling the participation will be considered issuers for purposes of the Fund’s investment restriction concerning industry concentration. See "Investment Restrictions". Further, in purchasing participations in lending syndicates, the Fund may be more limited than it otherwise would be in its ability to conduct due diligence on the Borrower. In addition, as a holder of the participations, the Fund may not have voting rights or inspection rights that the Fund would otherwise have if it were investing directly in the Senior Loan, which may result in the Fund being exposed to greater credit or fraud risk with respect to the Borrower or the Senior Loan.

Subordinated Loans Risk

Although the Fund does not initially expect Subordinated Loans to be a significant component of its portfolio, it may invest in such instruments from time to time. Subordinated Loans generally are subject to similar risks as those associated with investments in Senior Loans, except that such loans are subordinated in payment and/or lower in lien priority to first lien holders. In the event of default on a Subordinated Loan, the first priority lien holder has first claim to the underlying collateral of the loan to the extent such claim is secured. Additionally, an oversecured creditor may be entitled to additional interest and other charges in bankruptcy increasing the amount of their allowed claim. Subordinated Loans are subject to the additional risk that the cash flow of the Borrower and property securing the loan or debt, if any, may be insufficient to meet scheduled payments after giving effect to the senior obligations of the Borrower. This risk is generally higher for subordinated unsecured loans or debt, which are not backed by a security interest in any specific collateral. Subordinated Loans generally have greater price volatility than Senior Loans and may be less liquid.

Corporate Bond Risk

The market value of a Corporate Bond generally may be expected to rise and fall inversely with interest rates. The market value of intermediate- and longer-term Corporate Bonds is generally more sensitive to changes in interest rates than is the market value of shorter-term Corporate Bonds. The market value of a Corporate Bond also may be affected by factors directly related to the issuer, such as investors’ perceptions of the creditworthiness of the issuer, the issuer’s financial performance, perceptions of the issuer in the market place, performance of management of the issuer, the issuer’s capital structure and use of financial leverage and demand for the issuer’s goods and services. Certain risks associated with investments in Corporate Bonds are described elsewhere in this Prospectus in further detail, including under "Credit Risk", "Prepayment Risk" and "Inflation/Deflation Risk". There is a risk that the issuers of Corporate Bonds may not be able to meet their obligations on interest or principal payments at the time called for by an instrument. The Fund expects to invest primarily in Corporate Bonds that are high yield issues rated below investment grade. High yield Corporate Bonds are often high risk and have speculative characteristics. High yield Corporate Bonds may be particularly susceptible to adverse issuer-specific developments. High yield Corporate Bonds are subject to the risks described below under "Below Investment Grade Rating Risk."

CLO Securities Risk

The Fund will invest in CLO Securities issued by CLOs that principally invest in Senior Loans (typically, 80% or more of their assets), diversified by industry and Borrower. It is also possible that the underlying obligations of CLOs in which the Fund invests will include (i) Subordinated Loans, (ii) debt tranches of other CLOs, and (iii) equity securities incidental to investments in Senior Loans. Holders of such securities are subject to a number of risks, including the credit, liquidity, counterparty and other risks detailed below under ‘‘—Structured products risk,’’ and other market and asset specific risks.

CLO Securities are typically privately offered and sold and may be thinly traded or have a limited trading market. As a result, investments in CLO Securities may be characterized by the Fund as illiquid securities. In addition to the general risks associated with debt securities discussed above, CLOs carry additional risks, including, but not limited to: (i) the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the quality of the collateral may decline in value or default; and (iii) the possibility that the investments in CLOs are subordinate to other classes or tranches of the CLOs. 

CLOs issue securities in tranches with different payment characteristics and different credit ratings. The rated tranches of CLO Securities are generally assigned credit ratings by one or more nationally recognized statistical rating organizations. The subordinated (or residual) tranches do not receive ratings. Below investment grade tranches of CLO Securities typically experience a lower recovery, greater risk of loss or deferral or non-payment of interest than more senior tranches of the CLO.

The riskiest portion of the capital structure of a CLO is the subordinated (or residual) tranche, which bears the bulk of defaults from the loans in the CLO and serves to protect the other, more senior tranches from default in all but the most severe circumstances. Since it is partially protected from defaults, a senior tranche from a CLO typically has higher ratings and lower yields than the underlying securities, and can be rated investment grade. Despite the protection from the subordinated tranche, CLO tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of protecting tranches, market anticipation of defaults and aversion to CLO Securities as a class. The risks of an investment in a CLO depend largely on the collateral and the tranche of the CLO in which the Fund invests. 

The Fund may invest in any portion of the capital structure of CLOs (including the subordinated or residual tranche). As a result, the CLOs in which the Fund invests may have issued and sold debt tranches that will rank senior to the tranches in which the Fund invests. By their terms, such more senior tranches may entitle the holders to receive payment of interest or principal on or before the dates on which the Fund is entitled to receive payments with respect to the tranches in which the Fund invests. Also, in the event of insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of a CLO, holders of more senior tranches would typically be entitled to receive payment in full before the Fund receives any distribution. After repaying such senior creditors, such CLO may not have any remaining assets to use for repaying its obligation to the Fund. In the case of tranches ranking equally with the tranches in which the Fund invests, the Fund would have to share on an equal basis any distributions with other creditors holding such securities in the event of an insolvency, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or bankruptcy of the relevant CLO. Therefore, the Fund may not receive back the full amount of its investment in a CLO. 

The transaction documents relating to the issuance of CLO Securities may impose eligibility criteria on the assets of the CLO, restrict the ability of the CLO’s investment manager to trade investments and impose certain portfolio-wide asset quality requirements. These criteria, restrictions and requirements may limit the ability of the CLO’s investment manager to maximize returns on the CLO Securities. In addition, other parties involved in CLOs, such as third-party credit enhancers and investors in the rated tranches, may impose requirements that have an adverse effect on the returns of the various tranches of CLO Securities. Furthermore, CLO Securities issuance transaction documents generally contain provisions that, in the event that certain tests are not met (generally interest coverage and over-collateralization tests at varying levels in the capital structure), proceeds that would otherwise be distributed to holders of a junior tranche must be diverted to pay down the senior tranches until such tests are satisfied. Failure (or increased likelihood of failure) of a CLO to make timely payments on a particular tranche will have an adverse effect on the liquidity and market value of such tranche.

Payments to holders of CLO Securities may be subject to deferral. If cash flows generated by the underlying assets are insufficient to make all current and, if applicable, deferred payments on CLO Securities, no other assets will be available for payment of the deficiency and, following realization of the underlying assets, the obligations of the Borrower of the related CLO Securities to pay such deficiency will be extinguished. 

The market value of CLO Securities may be affected by, among other things, changes in the market value of the underlying assets held by the CLO, changes in the distributions on the underlying assets, defaults and recoveries on the underlying assets, capital gains and losses on the underlying assets, prepayments on underlying assets and the availability, prices and interest rate of underlying assets. Furthermore, the leveraged nature of each subordinated class may magnify the adverse impact on such class of changes in the value of the assets, changes in the distributions on the assets, defaults and recoveries on the assets, capital gains and losses on the assets, prepayment on assets and availability, price and interest rates of assets. Finally, CLO Securities are limited recourse and may not be paid in full and may be subject to up to 100% loss.

Asset Backed Securities Risk

Asset-backed securities often involve risks that are different from or more acute than risks associated with other types of debt instruments. For instance, asset-backed securities may be particularly sensitive to changes in prevailing interest rates. In addition, the underlying assets are subject to prepayments that shorten the securities’ weighted average maturity and may lower their return. Asset-backed securities are also subject to risks associated with their structure and the nature of the assets underlying the security and the servicing of those assets. Payment of interest and repayment of principal on asset-backed securities is largely dependent upon the cash flows generated by the assets backing the securities and, in certain cases, supported by letters of credit, surety bonds or other credit enhancements. The values of asset-backed securities may be substantially dependent on the servicing of the underlying asset pools, and are therefore subject to risks associated with the negligence by, or defalcation of, their servicers. Furthermore, debtors may be entitled to the protection of a number of state and federal consumer credit laws with respect to the assets underlying these securities, which may give the debtor the right to avoid or reduce payment. In addition, due to their often complicated structures, various asset-backed securities may be difficult to value and may constitute illiquid investments. If many borrowers on the underlying loans default, losses could exceed the credit enhancement level and result in losses to investors in asset-backed securities.

Below Investment Grade Rating Risk

The Fund expects initially that its investments in Senior Loans, Subordinated Loans, Corporate Bonds and other debt instruments will consist primarily of securities and loans that are rated below investment grade or unrated and of comparable credit quality. Corporate Bonds that are rated below investment grade are often referred to as "high yield" securities. Below investment grade Senior Loans, high yield securities and other similar instruments are rated "Ba1" or lower by Moody’s, "BB+" or lower by S&P or "BB+" or lower by Fitch or, if unrated, are judged by the Adviser to be of comparable credit quality. While generally providing greater income and opportunity for gain, below investment grade rated Corporate Bonds and Senior Loans and similar debt instruments may be subject to greater risks than securities or instruments that have higher credit ratings, including a higher risk of default. The credit rating of a Corporate Bond and Senior Loan that is rated below investment grade does not necessarily address its market value risk, and ratings may from time to time change, positively or negatively, to reflect developments regarding the issuer’s financial condition. Below investment grade Corporate Bonds and Senior Loans and similar instruments often are considered to be speculative with respect to the capacity of the Borrower to timely repay principal and pay interest or dividends in accordance with the terms of the obligation and may have more credit risk than higher rated securities. Lower grade securities and similar debt instruments may be particularly susceptible to economic downturns. It is likely that a prolonged or deepening economic recession could adversely affect the ability of some Borrowers issuing such Corporate Bonds, Senior Loans and similar debt instruments to repay principal and pay interest on the instrument, increase the incidence of default and severely disrupt the market value of the securities and similar debt instruments.

Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest in Senior Loans and Corporate Bonds, and may invest in Subordinated Loans and other debt instruments, rated in the lower rating categories ("Caa1" or lower by Moody’s, "CCC+" or lower by S&P or CCC+ or lower by Fitch) or unrated and of comparable quality. For these securities, the risks associated with below investment grade instruments are more pronounced. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek recovery upon a default in the payment of principal or interest on its portfolio holdings. In any reorganization or liquidation proceeding relating to an investment, the Fund may lose its entire investment or may be required to accept cash or securities with a value substantially less than its original investment.

Credit Risk

Credit risk is the risk that one or more loans or debt securities in the Fund’s portfolio will decline in price or one or more Borrowers will fail to pay interest or principal when due because one or more Borrowers experiences a decline in its financial condition. While a senior position in the capital structure of a Borrower may provide some protection with respect to the Fund’s investments in Senior Loans, losses may still occur because the market value of Senior Loans is affected by the creditworthiness of Borrowers and by general economic and specific industry conditions. To the extent the Fund invests in below investment grade Corporate Bonds, Senior Loans or other investments, it will be exposed to a greater amount of credit risk than a fund that invests in investment grade securities or loans. Typically, the prices of lower grade securities or loans are more sensitive to negative developments, such as a decline in the Borrower’s revenues or a general economic downturn, than are the prices of higher grade securities or loans.

Prepayment Risk

During periods of declining interest rates, Borrowers may exercise their option to prepay principal earlier than scheduled. For Corporate Bonds, such payments often occur during periods of declining interest rates, which may require the Fund to reinvest in lower yielding securities, resulting in a possible decline in the Fund’s income and distributions to shareholders. This is known as prepayment or "call" risk. Below investment grade Corporate Bonds frequently have call features that allow the issuer to redeem the security at dates prior to its stated maturity at a specified price (typically greater than the stated principal amount) only if certain prescribed conditions are met ("Call Protection"). An issuer may redeem Corporate Bonds if, for example, the issuer can refinance the debt at a lower cost due to declining interest rates or an improvement in the credit standing of the issuer. Fixed income securities may be purchased at prices below or above their stated principal amount. For premium Corporate Bonds (Corporate Bonds acquired at prices that exceed their stated principal amount), prepayment risk may be enhanced given that the Fund would lose the potential value of the yield-to-maturity of the bonds in the event they are redeemed at the stated principal amount.

Senior Loans and Subordinated Loans are subject to prepayment risk and typically do not have Call Protection. The degree to which Borrowers prepay Senior Loans and Subordinated Loans, whether as a contractual requirement or at their election, may be affected by general business conditions, the financial condition of the Borrower and competitive conditions among Senior Loan and Subordinated Loan investors, among others. For these reasons, prepayments cannot be predicted with accuracy. Upon a prepayment, either in part or in full, the outstanding debt from which the Fund derives interest income will be reduced. The Fund may not be able to reinvest the proceeds received on terms as favorable as the prepaid loan.

Interest Rate Risk

Because Senior Loans with floating or variable rates reset their interest rates periodically, changes in prevailing interest rates can be expected to cause some fluctuations in the Fund’s net asset value. Similarly, an increase in market interest rates (which are currently considered low by historic standards) may cause a decline in the Fund’s net asset value. In addition, Senior Loans or similar loans or securities may allow the Borrower to opt between LIBOR-based interest rates and interest rates based on bank prime rates, which may have an effect on the Fund’s net asset value.

Liquidity Risk

The Fund generally considers "illiquid securities" to be securities or loans that cannot be sold within seven days in the ordinary course of business at approximately the value used by the Fund in determining its net asset value. The Fund may not be able to readily dispose of such securities or loans at prices that approximate those at which the Fund could sell the securities or loans if they were more widely traded and, as a result of that illiquidity, the Fund may have to sell other investments or engage in borrowing transactions if necessary to raise cash to meet its obligations. Limited liquidity can also affect the market price of securities, thereby adversely affecting the Fund’s net asset value and ability to make dividend distributions.

Some Senior Loans are not readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. Senior Loans generally are not listed on any national securities exchange and no active trading market may exist for the Senior Loans in which the Fund may invest. When a secondary market exists, if at all, the market for some Senior Loans may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods. The Fund has no limitation on the amount of its assets that may be invested in securities that are not readily marketable or are subject to restrictions on resale.

Special Situations and Stressed Investments Risk

The Fund may invest in Special Situation Investments. Although such investments may result in significant returns for the Fund, they are speculative and involve a substantial degree of risk. The level of analytical sophistication, both financial and legal, necessary for successful investment in distressed assets is unusually high. Therefore, the Fund will be particularly dependent on the analytical abilities of the Adviser. In any reorganization or liquidation proceeding relating to a company in which the Fund invests, the Fund may lose its entire investment, may be required to accept cash or securities with a value less than the Fund’s original investment and/or may be required to accept payment over an extended period of time. Among the risks inherent in investments in a troubled company is that it may be difficult to obtain information as to the true financial condition of such company. Troubled company investments and other distressed asset-based investments require active monitoring. 

The Fund may make such investments when the Adviser believes it is reasonably likely that the Stressed Issuer will make an exchange offer or will be the subject of a plan of reorganization pursuant to which the Fund will receive new securities in return for a Special Situation Investment. There can be no assurance, however, that such an exchange offer will be made or that such a plan of reorganization will be adopted. In addition, a significant period of time may pass between the time at which the Fund makes its investment in the Special Situation Investment and the time that any such exchange offer or plan of reorganization is completed, if at all. During this period, it is unlikely that the Fund would receive any interest payments on the Special Situation Investment, the Fund would be subject to significant uncertainty whether the exchange offer or plan of reorganization will be completed and the Fund may be required to bear certain extraordinary expenses to protect and recover its investment. Therefore, to the extent the Fund seeks capital appreciation through investment in Special Situation Investments, the Fund’s ability to achieve current income for its shareholders may be diminished. The Fund also will be subject to significant uncertainty as to when, in what manner and for what value the obligations evidenced by Special Situation Investments will eventually be satisfied (e.g., through a liquidation of the obligor’s assets, an exchange offer or plan of reorganization involving the Special Situation Investments or a payment of some amount in satisfaction of the obligation). Even if an exchange offer is made or plan of reorganization is adopted with respect to Special Situation Investments held by the Fund, there can be no assurance that the securities or other assets received by the Fund in connection with such exchange offer or plan of reorganization will not have a lower value or income potential than may have been anticipated when the investment was made or even no value. Moreover, any securities received by the Fund upon completion of an exchange offer or plan of reorganization may be restricted as to resale. Similarly, if the Fund participates in negotiations with respect to any exchange offer or plan of reorganization with respect to an issuer of Special Situation Investments, the Fund may be restricted from disposing of such securities. To the extent that the Fund becomes involved in such proceedings, the Fund may have a more active participation in the affairs of the issuer than that assumed generally by an investor. 

Duration and Maturity Risk

The Fund has no fixed policy regarding portfolio maturity or duration. Holding long duration and long maturity investments will expose the Fund to certain magnified risks.

Inflation/Deflation Risk

Inflation risk is the risk that the value of certain assets or income from the Fund’s investments will be worth less in the future as inflation decreases the value of money. As inflation increases, the real value of investments and distributions can decline. In addition, during any periods of rising inflation, the dividend rates or borrowing costs associated with the Fund’s use of leverage would likely increase, which would tend to further reduce returns to shareholders. Deflation risk is the risk that prices throughout the economy decline over time—the opposite of inflation. Deflation may have an adverse effect on the creditworthiness of issuers and may make issuer defaults more likely, which may result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s portfolio.

Structured Product Risk

General. The Fund may invest in structured products, including, without limitation, investment grade rated CLO Debt Securities and structured notes. Holders of structured products bear risks of the underlying investments, index or reference obligation and are subject to counterparty risk. The risks associated with investments in CLO Debt Securities are described above under "—Collateralized Loan Obligation Risk".

The Fund may have the right to receive payments only from the structured product, and generally does not have direct rights against the issuer or the entity that sold the assets to be securitized. While certain structured products enable the investor to acquire interests in a pool of securities without the brokerage and other expenses associated with directly holding the same assets, investors in structured products generally pay their share of the structured product’s administrative and other expenses. Although it is difficult to predict whether the prices of indices and securities underlying structured products will rise or fall, these prices (and, therefore, the prices of structured products) will be influenced by the same types of political and economic events that affect issuers of securities and capital markets generally. If the issuer of a structured product uses shorter-term financing to purchase longer term securities, the issuer may be forced to sell its securities at below market prices if it experiences difficulty in obtaining short-term financing, which may adversely affect the value of the structured products owned by the Fund.

Investments in structured products involve risks, including credit risk and market risk. Certain structured products may be thinly traded or have a limited trading market. Where the Fund’s investments in structured products are based upon the movement of one or more factors, including currency exchange rates, interest rates, reference bonds and stock indices, depending on the factor used and the use of multipliers or deflators, changes in interest rates and movement of the factor may cause significant price fluctuations. Additionally, changes in the reference instrument or security may cause the interest rate on the structured product to be reduced to zero, and any further changes in the reference instrument may then reduce the principal amount payable on maturity. Structured products may be less liquid than other types of securities and more volatile than the reference instrument or security underlying the product.

The Fund may invest in structured products collateralized by below investment grade or distressed loans or securities. Investments in such structured products are subject to the risks associated with below investment grade securities. Such securities are characterized by high risk. It is likely that an economic recession could severely disrupt the market for such securities and may have an adverse impact on the value of such securities.

Structured Notes Risk. Investments in structured notes involve risks, including credit risk and market risk. Where the Fund’s investments in structured notes are based upon the movement of one or more factors, including currency exchange rates, interest rates, referenced bonds and stock indices, depending on the factor used and the use of multipliers or deflators, changes in interest rates and movement of the factor may cause significant price fluctuations. Additionally, changes in the reference instrument or security may cause the interest rate on the structured note to be reduced to zero, and any further changes in the reference instrument may then reduce the principal amount payable on maturity. Structured notes may be less liquid than other types of securities and more volatile than the reference instrument or security underlying the note.

Derivatives Risk

Swap Agreements Risk. The Fund may enter into swap agreements, including interest rate and index swap agreements, for hedging purposes, as a form of leverage or to seek to obtain a particular desired return at a lower cost to the Fund than if the Fund had invested directly in an instrument that yielded the desired return. Swap agreements are two party contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors for periods ranging from a few weeks to more than one year. In a standard "swap" transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments. Whether the Fund’s use of swap agreements will be successful in furthering its investment objective will depend on the Adviser’s ability to correctly predict whether certain types of investments are likely to produce greater returns than other investments. Because they are two party contracts and because they may have terms of greater than seven days, some swap agreements may be considered by the Fund to be illiquid. Moreover, the Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap agreement counterparty. The Fund may seek to reduce this risk to some extent by entering into a transaction only if the counterparty meets the Adviser’s current credit standards for OTC option counterparties. Swap agreements also bear the risk that the Fund will not be able to meet its payment obligations to the counterparty. Generally, the Fund will deposit in a segregated account liquid assets permitted to be so segregated by the SEC in an amount equal to or greater than the market value of the Fund’s liabilities under the swap agreement or the amount it would cost the Fund initially to make an equivalent direct investment plus or minus any amount the Fund is obligated to pay or is to receive under the swap agreement. Restrictions imposed by the tax rules applicable to regulated investment companies may limit the Fund’s ability to use swap agreements. The swap market currently is largely unregulated. It is possible that developments in the swap market, including potential significant government regulation, could adversely affect the Fund’s ability to enter into or terminate swap agreements or to realize amounts to be received under these agreements. Swap transactions may involve substantial leverage.

The Fund may enter into credit default swap agreements and similar agreements, and may also buy credit-linked securities. Credit default swaps are often structured with significant leverage and may be considered speculative. The credit default swap agreement or similar instrument may have as reference obligations one or more securities that are not currently held by the Fund. The protection "buyer" in a credit default contract may be obligated to pay the protection "seller" an upfront payment or a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract provided generally that no credit event on a reference obligation has occurred. If a credit event occurs, the seller generally must pay the buyer the "par value" (full notional value) of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity described in the swap, or the seller may be required to deliver the related net cash amount, if the swap is cash settled. The Fund may be either the buyer or seller in the transaction. If the Fund is a buyer and no credit event occurs, the Fund recovers nothing if the swap is held through its termination date. However, if a credit event occurs, the Fund may elect to receive the full notional value of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity that may have little or no value. As a seller, the Fund generally receives an upfront payment or a fixed rate of income throughout the term of the swap, which typically is between six months and three years, provided that there is no credit event. If a credit event occurs, generally the seller must pay the buyer the full notional value of the swap in exchange for an equal face amount of deliverable obligations of the reference entity that may have little or no value.

Swaptions Risk. The Fund, to the extent permitted under applicable law, may enter into "swaptions", which are options on swap agreements on either an asset-based or liability-based basis. A swaption is a contract that gives a counterparty the right (but not the obligation) to enter into a new swap agreement or to shorten, extend, cancel or otherwise modify an existing swap agreement, at some designated future time on specified terms. The Fund may write (sell) and purchase put and call swaptions. Depending on the terms of the particular option agreement, the Fund generally will incur a greater degree of risk when it writes a swaption than it will incur when it purchases a swaption. When the Fund purchases a swaption, it risks losing only the amount of the premium it has paid should it decide to let the option expire unexercised. When the Fund writes a swaption, upon exercise of the option, the Fund will become obligated according to the terms of the underlying agreement. Credit-Linked Securities Risk. Among the income producing securities in which the Fund may invest are credit-linked securities, which are issued by a limited purpose trust or other vehicle that, in turn, invests in a Derivative instrument or basket of Derivative instruments, such as credit default swaps, interest rate swaps and other securities, in order to provide exposure to certain fixed income markets. For instance, the Fund may invest in credit-linked securities as a cash management tool in order to gain exposure to a certain market and/or to remain fully invested when more traditional income producing securities are not available.

Like an investment in a bond, investments in these credit-linked securities represent the right to receive periodic income payments (in the form of distributions) and payment of principal at the end of the term of the security. However, these payments are conditioned on the issuer’s receipt of payments from, and the issuer’s potential obligations to, the counterparties to the Derivative instruments and other securities in which the issuer invests. For instance, the issuer may sell one or more credit default swaps, under which the issuer would receive a stream of payments over the term of the swap agreements provided that no event of default has occurred with respect to the referenced debt obligation upon which the swap is based. If a default occurs, the stream of payments may stop and the issuer would be obligated to pay the counterparty the par (or other agreed upon value) of the referenced debt obligation. This, in turn, would reduce the amount of income and principal that the Fund would receive. The Fund’s investments in these instruments are indirectly subject to the risks associated with Derivative instruments, including, among others, credit risk and leverage risk. There may be no established trading market for these securities and they may constitute illiquid investments.

General Risks Associated with Derivatives. Although the Fund does not expect derivative instruments ("Derivatives") to represent a significant component of its portfolio initially, the Fund may use Derivatives including, in particular, swaps (including, total return swaps), synthetic collateralized loan obligations, reverse repurchase agreements and other similar transactions, in seeking to achieve its investment objective or for other reasons, such as cash management, financing activities or to hedge its positions. Accordingly, Derivatives may be used in limited instances as a form of leverage or to seek to enhance returns, including speculation on changes in credit spreads, interest rates or other characteristics of the market, individual securities or groups of securities. If the Fund invests in a Derivative for speculative purposes, which the Fund does not initially intend to do, the Fund will be fully exposed to the risks of loss of that Derivative, which may sometimes be greater than the Derivative’s cost. The use of Derivatives may involve substantial leverage. The use of Derivatives may subject the Fund to the following risks, including but not limited to:

  • Credit risk—the risk that the counterparty in a Derivative transaction will be unable to honor its financial obligation to the Fund, or the risk that the reference entity in a credit default swap or similar Derivative will not be able to honor its financial obligations. Certain participants in the Derivatives market, including larger financial institutions, have recently experienced significant financial hardship and deteriorating credit conditions. If the Fund’s counterparty to a Derivative transaction experiences a loss of capital, or is perceived to lack adequate capital or access to capital, it may experience margin calls or other regulatory requirements to increase equity. Under such circumstances, the risk that a counterparty will be unable to honor its obligations may increase substantially. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or otherwise fails to perform its obligations under a derivative contract, the Fund may experience significant delays in obtaining any recovery under the derivative contract in bankruptcy or other reorganization proceeding. The Fund may obtain only a limited recovery or may obtain no recovery in such circumstances.
  • Currency risk—the risk that changes in the exchange rate between two currencies will adversely affect the value (in U.S. dollar terms) of an investment.
  • Leverage risk—the risk associated with certain types of Derivative strategies that relatively small market movements may result in large changes in the value of an investment. Certain investments or trading strategies that involve leverage can result in losses that greatly exceed the amount originally invested.
  • Liquidity risk—the risk that certain securities may be difficult or impossible to sell at the time that the seller would like or at the price that the seller believes the security is currently worth. This risk is heightened to the extent the Fund engages in OTC Derivative transactions.
  • Correlation risk—the risk that changes in the value of a Derivative will not match the changes in the value of the portfolio holdings that are being hedged or of the particular market, security or loan to which the Fund seeks exposure.
  • Index risk—if the Derivative is linked to the performance of an index, it will be subject to the risks associated with changes in that index. If the index changes, the Fund could receive lower interest payments or experience a reduction in the value of the Derivative to below what the Fund paid. Certain indexed securities, including inverse securities (which move in an opposite direction to the index), may create leverage, to the extent that they increase or decrease in value at a rate that is a multiple of the changes in the applicable index.
  • Regulatory risk—various legislative and regulatory initiatives may impact the availability, liquidity and cost of derivative instruments, including potentially limiting or restricting the ability of the Fund to use certain derivative instruments or certain counterparties as a part of its investment strategy, increasing the costs of using these instruments or making these instruments less effective.

See "Risk Factors—Legislation and Regulation Risks".

Other Risks Relating to Fund Investments

Risks associated with investments in equity securities incidental to investments in Senior Loans From time to time, the Fund also may invest in or hold common stock and other equity securities incidental to the purchase or ownership of a Senior Loan or other debt instruments or in connection with a reorganization of a Borrower. Investments in equity securities incidental to investments in Senior Loans or other debt instruments entail certain risks in addition to those associated with investments in Senior Loans or other debt instruments. Because equity is merely the residual value of an issuer after all claims and other interests, it is inherently more risky than Senior Loans or other debt instruments of the same Borrower.

The value of the equity securities may be affected more rapidly, and to a greater extent, by company-specific developments and general market conditions. These risks may increase fluctuations in the Fund’s net asset value. The Fund frequently may possess material non-public information about a Borrower as a result of its ownership of a Senior Loan or other debt instruments of a Borrower. Because of prohibitions on trading in securities while in possession of material non-public information, the Fund might be unable to enter into a transaction in a security of the Borrower when it would otherwise be advantageous to do so.

Short Sales Risk

The Fund may, from time to time, engage in short sales. A short sale is a transaction in which the Fund sells an instrument that it does not own in anticipation that the market price will decline. To deliver the securities to the buyer, the Fund arranges through a broker to borrow the securities and, in so doing, the Fund becomes obligated to replace the securities borrowed at their market price at the time of replacement. When selling short, the Fund intends to replace the securities at a lower price and therefore, profit from the difference between the cost to replace the securities and the proceeds received from the sale of the securities. When the Fund makes a short sale, the proceeds it receives from the sale will be held on behalf of a broker until the Fund replaces the borrowed securities. The Fund may have to pay a premium to borrow the securities and must pay any dividends or interest payable on the securities until they are replaced. The Fund’s obligation to replace the securities borrowed in connection with a short sale will be secured by collateral deposited with the broker that consists of cash and/or liquid securities. In addition, the Fund will place in a segregated account an amount of cash and/or liquid securities equal to the difference, if any, between (i) the market value of the securities sold at the time they were sold short, and (ii) any cash and/or liquid securities deposited as collateral with the broker in connection with the short sale. Short sales involve certain risks and special considerations. If the Fund incorrectly predicts that the price of the borrowed security will decline, the Fund will have to replace the securities with securities with a greater value than the amount received from the sale. As a result, losses from short sales differ from losses that could be incurred from a purchase of a security, because losses from short sales may be unlimited, whereas losses from purchases can equal only the total amount invested.

Warrants Risk

Warrants give holders the right, but not the obligation, to buy common stock of an issuer at a given price, usually higher than the market price at the time of issuance, during a specified period. The risk of investing in a warrant is that the warrant may expire prior to the market value of the common stock exceeding the price fixed by the warrant. Warrants have a subordinate claim on a borrower’s assets compared with Senior Loans. As a result, the values of warrants generally are dependent on the financial condition of the borrower and less dependent on fluctuations in interest rates than are the values of many debt securities. The values of warrants may be more volatile than those of Senior Loans or Corporate Bonds and this may increase the volatility of the Fund’s NAV of the Common Shares.

Lender Liability Risk

A number of U.S. judicial decisions have upheld judgments of borrowers against lending institutions on the basis of various evolving legal theories, collectively termed "lender liability". Generally, lender liability is founded on the premise that a lender has violated a duty (whether implied or contractual) of good faith, commercial reasonableness and fair dealing, or a similar duty owed to the Borrower or has assumed an excessive degree of control over the Borrower resulting in the creation of a fiduciary duty owed to the Borrower or its other creditors or shareholders. Because of the nature of its investments, the Fund may be subject to allegations of lender liability.

In addition, under common law principles that in some cases form the basis for lender liability claims, if a lender or bondholder (i) intentionally takes an action that results in the undercapitalization of a Borrower to the detriment of other creditors of such Borrower; (ii) engages in inequitable conduct to the detriment of the other creditors; (iii) engages in fraud with respect to, or makes misrepresentations to, the other creditors; or (iv) uses its influence as a stockholder to dominate or control a Borrower to the detriment of other creditors of the Borrower, a court may elect to subordinate the claim of the offending lender or bondholder to the claims of the disadvantaged creditor or creditors, a remedy called "equitable subordination".

Because affiliates of, or persons related to, the Adviser may hold equity or other interests in obligors of the Fund, the Fund could be exposed to claims for equitable subordination or lender liability or both based on such equity or other holdings.

Non-U.S. Securities Risk

The Fund may invest in securities, including Senior Loans and Subordinated Loans, of non-U.S. issuers or Borrowers. These investments involve certain risks not involved in domestic investments and may experience more rapid and extreme changes in value than investments in securities of U.S. companies. Markets for these investments in foreign countries often are not as developed, efficient or liquid as similar markets in the United States, and therefore, the prices of non-U.S. securities may be more volatile. Certain foreign countries may impose restrictions on the ability of issuers of non-U.S. securities to make payments of principal and interest to investors located outside the country, whether from currency blockage or otherwise. In addition, the Fund will be subject to risks associated with adverse political and economic developments in foreign countries, including seizure or nationalization of foreign deposits, different legal systems and laws relating to creditors’ rights and the potential inability to enforce legal judgments, all of which could cause the Fund to lose money on its investments in non-U.S. securities. Generally, there is less readily available and reliable information about non-U.S. issuers or Borrowers due to less rigorous disclosure or accounting standards and regulatory practices. The ability of a foreign sovereign issuer to make timely payments on its debt obligations will also be strongly influenced by the sovereign issuer’s balance of payments, including export performance, its access to international credit facilities and investments, fluctuations of interest rates and the extent of its foreign reserves. The cost of servicing external debt generally will also be adversely affected by rising international interest rates, as many external debt obligations bear interest at rates that are adjusted based upon international interest rates. Because non-U.S. securities may trade on days when the Fund’s common shares are not traded on the NYSE, the market value or net asset value of the Fund’s shares can change at times when the Fund’s common shares cannot be sold. Investments in so-called "emerging markets" (or lesser developed countries) are particularly speculative and entail all of the risks of investing in Non-U.S. Securities but to a heightened degree. Compared to developed countries, emerging market countries may have relatively unstable governments, economies based on only a few industries and securities markets that trade a small number of securities. Securities issued by companies located in emerging market countries tend to be especially volatile and may be less liquid than securities traded in developed countries.

Eurozone Risk

The Fund intends to invest in securities of European companies and companies that have operations that may be affected by the Eurozone economy. Recent concerns regarding the sovereign debt of various Eurozone countries and proposals for investors to incur substantial write-downs and reductions in the face value of Greek sovereign debt have given rise to new concerns about sovereign defaults, the possibility that one or more countries might leave the European Union or the Eurozone and various proposals (still under consideration and unclear in material respects) for support of affected countries and the Euro as a currency. The outcome of this situation cannot yet be predicted. Sovereign debt defaults and European Union and/or Eurozone exists could have material adverse effects on investments by the Fund in securities of European companies, including but not limited to the availability of credit to support such companies’ financing needs, uncertainty and disruption in relation to financing, customer and supply contracts denominated in Euro and wider economic disruption in markets served by those companies, while austerity and other measures that have been introduced in order to limit or contain these issues may themselves lead to economic contraction and resulting adverse effects for the Fund. It is possible that a number of the Fund’s securities will be denominated in the Euro. Legal uncertainty about the funding of Euro denominated obligations following any breakup or exits from the Eurozone (particularly in the case of investments in securities of companies in affected countries) could also have material adverse effects on the Fund.

Foreign Currency Risk

Because the Fund may invest in securities denominated or quoted in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, changes in foreign currency exchange rates may affect the value of securities in the Fund and the unrealized appreciation or depreciation of investments. Currencies of certain countries may be volatile and therefore may affect the value of securities denominated in such currencies, which means that the Fund’s net asset value could decline as a result of changes in the exchange rates between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar. The Adviser may, but is not required to, elect for the Fund to seek to protect itself from changes in currency exchange rates through hedging transactions depending on market conditions. The Fund may incur costs in connection with the conversions between various currencies. In addition, certain countries may impose foreign currency exchange controls or other restrictions on the repatriation, transferability or convertibility of currency.

Repurchase Agreements and Reverse Repurchase Agreements Risk

Repurchase agreements carry certain risks not associated with direct investments in securities, including a possible decline in the market value of the underlying obligations. If their value becomes less than the repurchase price, plus any agreed-upon additional amount, the counterparty must provide additional collateral so that at all times the collateral is at least equal to the repurchase price plus any agreed-upon additional amount. The difference between the total amount to be received upon repurchase of the obligations and the price that was paid by the Fund upon acquisition is accrued as interest and included in its net investment income.

Repurchase agreements involving obligations other than U.S. Government securities (such as commercial paper and Corporate Bonds) may be subject to special risks and may not have the benefit of certain protections in the event of the counterparty’s insolvency. In the event of the bankruptcy or other default of a seller of a repurchase agreement, the Fund could experience both delays in liquidating the underlying securities and losses, including (1) possible decline in the value of the underlying security during the period in which the Fund seeks to enforce its rights thereto; (2) possible lack of access to income on the underlying security during this period; and (3) expenses of enforcing its rights.

Reverse repurchase agreements involve the risk that the buyer of the securities sold by the Fund might be unable to deliver them when the Fund seeks to repurchase. In the event that the buyer of securities under a reverse repurchase agreement files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, the buyer, trustee or receiver may receive an extension of time to determine whether to enforce the Fund’s obligation to repurchase the securities, and the Fund’s use of the proceeds of the reverse repurchase agreement may effectively be restricted pending such decision.

U.S. Government Debt Securities Risk

U.S. Government debt securities historically have not involved the credit risks associated with investments in other types of debt securities, although, as a result, the yields available from U.S. Government debt securities are generally lower than the yields available from other securities. Like other debt securities, however, the values of U.S. Government securities change as interest rates fluctuate and in 2011 the credit rating of the United States was downgraded. Fluctuations in the value of portfolio securities will not affect interest income on existing portfolio securities but will be reflected in the Fund’s net asset value. Because the magnitude of these fluctuations will generally be greater at times when the Fund’s average maturity is longer, under certain market conditions, the Fund may, for temporary defensive purposes, accept lower current income from short-term investments rather than investing in higher yielding long-term securities.

Risks Associated with Market Developments and Regulatory Changes

Market Developments Risk

Severe disruptions in global capital markets over the past five years and the continued impact of the financial crisis of 2008 and the more recent sovereign debt and banking issues in Europe may influence the Fund’s performance. Since 2007, and most severely in 2008 and 2009, global capital markets have been in a period of disruption evidenced by a lack of liquidity in the debt capital markets, significant write-offs in the financial services sector, the re-pricing of credit risk in the broadly syndicated credit market and the failure of certain major financial institutions. Global capital markets remain unstable and subject to volatility as of the date of this prospectus. Despite actions of the United States federal government and foreign governments, these events have contributed to general economic conditions that are materially and adversely impacting the broader financial and credit markets and reducing the availability of debt and equity capital for the market as a whole and financial services firms in particular. These conditions could continue for a prolonged period of time or worsen in the future. While these conditions persist, the capital markets, and, in particular, the market for debt obligations, may be subject to heightened volatility, increased risks of default, periods of illiquidity and other situations adverse to investors.

Instability in the credit markets has made it more difficult at certain times for a number of issuers of debt securities to obtain financing or refinancing for their investment or lending activities or operations. In particular, because of volatile conditions in the credit markets, issuers of debt securities may be subject to increased cost for debt, tightening underwriting standards and reduced liquidity for loans they make, securities they purchase and securities they issue. Certain Borrowers may, due to macroeconomic conditions, be unable to repay their Senior Loans or other debt obligations because of these conditions. A Borrower’s failure to satisfy financial or operating covenants imposed by lenders could lead to defaults and, potentially, termination of the Senior Loans and foreclosure on the underlying secured assets, which could trigger cross-defaults under other agreements and jeopardize a Borrower’s ability to meet its obligations under its debt securities. The Fund may incur expenses to the extent necessary to seek recovery upon default or to negotiate new terms with a defaulting Borrower. The Fund may also experience a loss of principal.

These developments also (i) may make it more difficult for the Fund to accurately value its portfolio securities or to sell its portfolio securities on a timely basis; (ii) could adversely affect the ability of the Fund to use leverage for investment purposes and increase the cost of such leverage, which would reduce returns to the common shareholders; and (iii) may adversely affect the broader economy, which in turn may adversely affect the ability of issuers of securities owned by the Fund to make payments of principal and interest when due, lead to lower credit ratings of the issuer and increased defaults by the issuer. Such developments could, in turn, reduce the value of securities owned by the Fund and adversely affect the net asset value and market price of the Fund’s common shares.

According to various reports, certain financial institutions, commencing as early as 2005 and throughout the global financial crisis, may have routinely made artificially low submissions in the LIBOR rate setting process. In June 2012, one such financial institution was fined a significant amount by various financial regulators in connection with allegations of manipulation of LIBOR rates. Investigations of other financial institutions for similar actions in various countries are ongoing. These developments may have adversely affected the interest rates on securities whose interest payments were determined by reference to LIBOR, including certain Senior Loans. Any future similar developments could, in turn, reduce the value of such securities owned by the Fund.

Government Intervention in the Financial Markets Risk

The recent instability in the financial markets has led the U.S. Government, the Federal Reserve and other governments and central banks around the world to take a number of unprecedented actions designed to support certain financial institutions and segments of the financial markets that have experienced extreme volatility, and in some cases a lack of liquidity. Federal, state, and other governments, their regulatory agencies or self-regulatory organizations may take additional actions that affect the regulation of the securities, debt instruments or structured products in which the Fund invests, or the issuers of such securities or structured products, in ways that are unforeseeable. The Adviser will monitor developments and seek to manage the Fund’s portfolio in a manner consistent with achieving the Fund’s investment objective, but there can be no assurance that it will be successful in doing so. Governments or their agencies may also acquire distressed assets from financial institutions and acquire ownership interests in those institutions. The implications of government ownership and disposition of these assets are unclear, and such programs may have positive or negative effects on the liquidity, valuation and performance of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. Furthermore, volatile financial markets can expose the Fund to greater market and liquidity risk and potential difficulty in valuing portfolio instruments held by the Fund. The Adviser will monitor developments and seek to manage the Fund’s portfolio in a manner consistent with achieving the Fund’s investment objective, but there can be no assurance that it will be successful in doing so.

Legislation and Regulation Risk

On July 21, 2010, the President signed into law major financial services reform legislation in the form of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act"). The Dodd-Frank Act, among other things, grants regulatory authorities such as the Commodity Futures Trading Commission ("CFTC") and SEC broad rulemaking authority to implement various provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act, including comprehensive regulation of the over-the-counter derivatives market. It is unclear how these regulators will exercise these revised and expanded powers and whether they will undertake rulemaking, supervisory or enforcement actions that would adversely affect the Fund or investments made by the Fund. Possible regulatory actions taken under these revised and expanded powers may include actions related to financial consumer protection, proprietary trading and derivatives. While some regulations have been adopted, a number of important rulemakings have not yet been completed and there can be no assurance that future regulatory actions authorized by the Dodd-Frank Act will not significantly reduce the revenues of the Fund. The implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act could adversely affect the Fund by increasing transaction and/or regulatory compliance costs and may impact the availability, liquidity and cost of derivative instruments, including potentially limiting or restricting the ability of the Fund to use certain derivative instruments or certain counterparties as a part of its investment strategy, increasing the costs of using these instruments or making these instruments less effective. In addition, greater regulatory scrutiny may increase the Fund’s and the Adviser’s exposure to potential liabilities. Increased regulatory oversight can also impose administrative burdens on the Fund and the Adviser, including, without limitation, responding to examinations or investigations and implementing new policies and procedures. In connection with an ongoing review by the SEC and its staff of the regulation of investment companies’ use of derivatives, on August 31, 2011, the SEC issued a concept release to seek public comment on a wide range of issues raised by the use of derivatives by investment companies. The SEC noted that it intends to consider the comments to help determine whether regulatory initiatives or guidance are needed to improve the current regulatory regime for investment companies and, if so, the nature of any such initiatives or guidance. While the nature of any such regulations or interpretations is uncertain at this time, it is possible that such regulations could limit the implementation of the Fund’s use of derivatives, which could have an adverse impact on the Fund. Neither the Fund nor the Adviser can predict the effects of these regulations or interpretations on the Fund’s portfolio. The Adviser intends to monitor developments and seek to manage the Fund’s portfolio in a manner consistent with achieving the Fund’s investment objective, but there can be no assurance that they will be successful in doing so.

At any time after the date of this prospectus, legislation may be enacted that could negatively affect the assets of the Fund or the issuers of such assets. Changing approaches to regulation may have a negative impact on the entities in which the Fund invests. Legislation or regulation may also change the way in which the Fund itself is regulated. There can be no assurance that future legislation, regulation or deregulation will not have a material adverse effect on the Fund or will not impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective.

Risks Associated with Recent Commodity Futures Trading Commission Rulemaking

On February 9, 2012, the CFTC adopted amendments to its rules that, by the applicable compliance date, may cause the Fund to fall within the definition of "commodity pool" under the Commodity Exchange Act ("CEA") and require the Adviser to register with the CFTC as a "commodity pool operator". If the Fund does not claim an exclusion from the definition of commodity pool operator, the Fund believes that the Adviser would likely become subject to registration and regulation as a commodity pool operator with respect to the Fund. The Fund may incur additional expenses as a result of the CFTC’s regulatory requirements. If, in the alternative, the Fund elects to claim an exclusion from the definition of the term commodity pool operator pursuant to Section 4.5 of the CFTC’s Rules, then the Fund would be limited in its ability to use futures or options on futures or engage in swap transactions. The impact of the rule changes on the operations of the Fund and the Adviser is not fully known at this time as it is dependent upon, among other things, the outcome of other pending rulemakings and a court challenge to certain of the rule changes adopted by the CFTC earlier this year. The Fund and the Adviser are continuing to analyze the effect of these rule changes on the Fund.

Market Disruption and Geopolitical Risk

The European sovereign debt crisis, instability in the Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan, the aftermath of the war in Iraq, terrorist attacks in the United States and around the world, the impact of natural disasters and other events may result in market volatility, may have long-term adverse effects on the United States and worldwide financial markets and may cause further economic uncertainties in the United States and worldwide. The Fund does not know how long the financial markets may be affected by these events and cannot predict the effects of these events or similar events in the future on the U.S. economy and financial markets. These events could impact interest rates, secondary trading, ratings, credit risk, inflation and other factors relating to an investment in the Fund’s common shares. Senior Loans and Corporate Bonds rated below investment grade and investments with similar economic characteristics tend to be more volatile than investment grade fixed income securities and, as a result, these events and other market disruptions may have a greater impact on the prices and volatility of such investments than on investment grade fixed income securities. There can be no assurance that such market disruptions may not have other material and adverse implications for the Senior Loan and Corporate Bond markets or other markets in which we may invest.

Principal Risks Relating to the Fund Operations

Leverage Risk

The Fund intends to utilize leverage and may utilize leverage to the maximum extent permitted by law for investment and other general corporate purposes. The Fund may obtain leverage by issuing preferred shares and/or notes and it may also borrow funds from banks and other financial institutions. The Fund may also gain leverage synthetically through swaps and other Derivatives. The use of leverage to purchase additional securities creates an opportunity for increased common share dividends, but also creates risks for the Fund’s common shareholders, including increased variability of the Fund’s net income, distributions, net asset value and/or market price of its common shares in relation to market changes. Leverage is a speculative technique that exposes the Fund to greater risk and increased costs than if it were not implemented. Increases and decreases in the value of the Fund’s portfolio will be magnified if the Fund uses leverage. In particular, leverage may magnify interest rate risk, which is the risk that the prices of portfolio securities will fall (or rise) if market interest rates for those types of securities rise (or fall). As a result, leverage may cause greater changes in the Fund’s net asset value, which will be borne entirely by the Fund’s common shareholders, and in the price at which its common shares trade in the secondary market. To the extent that the Fund makes investments in Senior Loans or other debt instruments structured with LIBOR floors, the Fund will not realize additional income if rates increase to levels below the LIBOR floor but the Fund’s cost of financing is expected to increase, resulting in the potential for a decrease in the level of income available for dividends or distributions made by the Fund. If the Fund issues preferred shares and/or notes or engages in other borrowings, it will have to pay dividends on its preferred shares or interest on its notes or borrowings, which will increase expenses and may reduce the Fund’s return. These dividend payments or interest expenses (which will be borne entirely by common shareholders) may be greater than the Fund’s return on the underlying investments. The Fund’s leveraging strategy, if utilized, may not be successful.

The Fund may issue preferred shares and/or notes or other forms of indebtedness as a form of leverage. These means of obtaining leverage would be senior to the Fund’s common shares, such that holders of preferred shares and/or notes or other Fund indebtedness would have priority over the common shareholders in the distribution of the Fund’s assets, including dividends, distributions of principal and liquidating distributions. If preferred shares are issued and outstanding, holders of preferred shares would vote together with the holders of common shares on all matters, including the election of directors. Additionally, holders of preferred shares would have the right separately to elect two directors of the Fund, voting separately as a class, and would vote separately as a class on certain matters which may at times give holders of preferred shares disproportionate influence over the Fund’s affairs. If the preferred shares were limited in their term, redemptions of such preferred shares would require the Fund to liquidate its investments and would reduce the Fund’s use of leverage, which could negatively impact common shareholders. In addition, if the Fund elects to issue preferred shares and/or notes (or other forms of indebtedness) its ability to make distributions to its common shareholders or to repurchase its stock will be limited by the asset coverage requirements and other limitations imposed by the Investment Company Act and the Fund’s lenders.

The Fund will pay (and common shareholders will bear) all costs and expenses relating to the issuance and ongoing maintenance of any preferred shares and/or notes or other forms of indebtedness issued by the Fund, including higher advisory fees. As a result, the Fund cannot assure you that the issuance of preferred shares and/or notes or other forms of indebtedness will provide a higher yield or return to the holders of the Fund’s common shares. If the Fund offers and/or issues preferred shares and/or notes or other forms of indebtedness, the costs of the offering will be borne immediately by the Fund’s common shareholders and result in a reduction of the net asset value of the Fund’s common shares. The Fund anticipates that any money borrowed from a bank or other financial institution for investment purposes will accrue interest based on shorter-term interest rates that would be periodically reset. So long as the Fund’s portfolio provides a higher rate of return, net of expenses, than the interest rate on borrowed money, as reset periodically, the leverage may cause common shareholders to receive a higher current rate of return than if the Fund were not leveraged. If, however, long-term and/or short-term rates rise, the interest rate on borrowed money could exceed the rate of return on securities held by the Fund, reducing returns to common shareholders. Developments in the credit markets may adversely affect the ability of the Fund to borrow for investment purposes and may increase the costs of such borrowings, which would reduce returns to common shareholders.

There is no assurance that a leveraging strategy will be successful. Leverage involves risks and special considerations for common shareholders, including:

  • the likelihood of greater volatility of net asset value, market price and dividend rate of common shares than a comparable portfolio without leverage;
  • the risk that fluctuations in interest rates on borrowings or in dividend payments on, principal proceeds distributed to, or redemption of any preferred shares and/or notes or other forms of indebtedness that the Fund has issued will reduce the return to the common shareholders;
  • the effect of leverage in a declining market, which is likely to cause a greater decline in the net asset value of the Fund’s common shares than if the Fund were not leveraged, which may result in a greater decline in the market price of the Fund’s common shares;
  • when the Fund uses financial leverage, the investment advisory fees payable to the Adviser will be higher than if the Fund did not use leverage, and may provide a financial incentive to the Adviser to increase the Fund’s use of leverage and create an inherent conflict of interest; and
  • leverage may increase expenses (which will be borne entirely by common shareholders), which may reduce total return.

If the Fund issues preferred shares and/or notes or other forms of indebtedness, the Fund may be subject to certain restrictions on investments imposed by the guidelines of one or more rating agencies, which may issue ratings for the preferred shares and/or notes or short-term debt securities issued by the Fund, or may be subject to covenants or other restrictions imposed by its lenders. These guidelines may impose asset coverage or portfolio composition requirements that are more stringent than those imposed by the Investment Company Act. Certain types of borrowings by the Fund may result in the Fund being subject to covenants relating to asset coverage and portfolio composition requirements. These covenants and restrictions may negatively affect the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective.

Valuation Risk

The Fund utilizes independent pricing services approved by the Board of Directors to value certain portfolio instruments at their market value. If the pricing services are unable to provide a market value or if a significant event occurs such that the valuation(s) provided are deemed unreliable, the Fund may value portfolio instrument(s) at their fair value, which is generally the amount an owner might reasonably expect to receive upon a current sale. Valuation risks associated with investing in Senior Loans including, but not limited to: a limited number of market participants compared to publicly traded investment grade securities, a lack of publicly available information about some borrowers, resale restrictions, settlement delays, corporate actions and adverse market conditions may make it difficult to value or sell such instruments. Because non-U.S. instruments may trade on days when common shares are not priced, net asset value can change at times when common shares cannot be sold.

New Adviser Risk

The Adviser is a newly organized entity with no operating history. The Adviser’s sole assets under management initially will be the assets raised in connection with the initial public offering of the Fund’s common shares. The Adviser is an affiliate of Ares and leverages off of Ares’ entire investment platform and benefits from the significant capital markets, trading and research expertise of all of Ares’ investment professionals. Founded in 1997, Ares is a global alternative asset manager and SEC registered investment adviser with approximately $56 billion of total committed capital under management and approximately 550 employees as of September 30, 2012. Ares has 240 investment professionals covering current investments in approximately 1,100 companies across over 30 industries as of September 30, 2012. The Fund’s portfolio management team is comprised of members of Ares’ Capital Markets Group.

Key Personnel Risk

The Adviser depends on the diligence, skill and network of business contacts of certain Ares Capital Markets Group professionals. The Adviser also depends, to a significant extent, on access to other investment professionals within Ares and the information and deal flow generated by these investment professionals in the course of their investment and portfolio management activities. The Fund’s success depends on the continued service of such personnel. The Adviser has informed the Fund that the investment professionals associated with the Adviser are actively involved in other investment activities not concerning the Fund and will not be able to devote all of their time to the Fund’s business and affairs. The departure of any of the senior managers of the Adviser, or of a significant number of the investment professionals or partners of the Adviser’s affiliates, could have a material adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. Individuals not currently associated with the Adviser may become associated with the Fund and the performance of the Fund may also depend on the experience and expertise of such individuals. In addition, there is no assurance that the Adviser will remain the Fund’s investment adviser or that the Adviser will continue to have access to the investment professionals and partners of its affiliates and the information and deal flow generated by the investment professionals of its affiliates.

Potential Conflicts of Interest Risk—Allocation of Investment Opportunities

The Adviser has adopted allocation procedures that are intended to ensure that each fund or account managed by Ares ("Ares-advised funds") is treated in a manner that, over a period of time, is fair and equitable. Certain existing Ares-advised funds have, and future Ares-advised funds may have, investment objectives similar to those of the Fund, and such Ares-advised funds will invest in asset classes similar to those targeted by the Fund. Certain other existing Ares-advised funds do not, and future Ares-advised funds may not, have similar investment objectives, but such Ares-Advised funds may from time to time invest in asset classes similar to those targeted by the Fund. The Adviser will endeavor to allocate investment opportunities in a fair and equitable manner, and in any event consistent with any fiduciary duties owed to the Fund and other clients and in an effort to avoid favoring one client over another and taking into account all relevant facts and circumstances, including (without limitation): (i) differences with respect to available capital, size of client, and remaining life of a client; (ii) differences in investment objectives or current investment strategies, including regarding: (a) current and total return objectives, (b) emphasizing or limiting exposure to the security or type of security in question, (c) diversification, including industry or company exposure, currency and jurisdiction, or (d) credit ratings; (iii) differences in risk profile at the time an opportunity becomes available; (iv) the potential transaction and other costs of allocating an opportunity among various clients; (v) potential conflicts of interest, including whether a client has an existing investment in the security in question or the issuer of such security; (vi) the nature of the security or the transaction including minimum investment amounts and the source of the opportunity; (vii) current and anticipated market and general economic conditions; (viii) existing positions in a Borrower/loan/ security; and (ix) prior positions in a Borrower/loan/security. Nevertheless, it is possible that the Fund may not be given the opportunity to participate in certain investments made by investment funds managed by investment managers affiliated with the Adviser. In the event investment opportunities are allocated among the Fund and the other Ares-advised funds, the Fund may not be able to structure its investment portfolio in the manner desired.

Furthermore, the Fund and the other Ares-advised funds may make investments in securities where the prevailing trading activity may make impossible the receipt of the same price or execution on the entire volume of securities purchased or sold by the Fund and the other Ares-advised funds. When this occurs, the various prices may be averaged, and the Fund will be charged or credited with the average price. Thus, the effect of the aggregation may operate on some occasions to the disadvantage of the Fund. In addition, under certain circumstances, the Fund may not be charged the same commission or commission equivalent rates in connection with a bunched or aggregated order.

It is likely that the other Ares-advised funds may make investments in the same or similar securities at different times and on different terms than the Fund. The Fund and the other Ares-advised funds may make investments at different levels of a Borrower’s capital structure or otherwise in different classes of a Borrower’s securities. Such investments may inherently give rise to conflicts of interest or perceived conflicts of interest between or among the various classes of securities that may be held by such entities. Conflicts may also arise because portfolio decisions regarding the Fund may benefit the other Ares-advised funds. For example, the sale of a long position or establishment of a short position by the Fund may impair the price of the same security sold short by (and therefore benefit) one or more Ares-advised funds, and the purchase of a security or covering of a short position in a security by the Fund may increase the price of the same security held by (and therefore benefit) one or more Ares-advised funds.

The Adviser, its affiliates and their clients may pursue or enforce rights with respect to an issuer in which the Fund has invested, and those activities may have an adverse effect on the Fund. As a result, prices, availability, liquidity and terms of the Fund’s investments may be negatively impacted by the activities of the Adviser and its affiliates or their clients, and transactions for the Fund may be impaired or effected at prices or terms that may be less favorable than would otherwise have been the case.

The Adviser is paid a fee based on a percentage of the Fund’s Managed Assets. The Adviser may have a conflict of interest in deciding whether to cause the Fund to incur leverage or to invest in more speculative investments or financial instruments, thereby potentially increasing the assets of the Fund and, accordingly, the fees received by the Adviser. Certain other Ares-advised funds pay the Adviser or its affiliates performance-based compensation, which could create an incentive for the Adviser or affiliate to favor such investment fund or account over the Fund. See "Conflicts of Interest" for an additional discussion of the types of conflicts of interest to which the operations of the Fund may be subject.

Potential Conflicts of Interest Risk—Allocation of Personnel

The Fund’s executive officers and directors, and the employees of the Adviser, serve or may serve as officers, directors or principals of entities that operate in the same or a related line of business as the Fund or of investment funds or accounts managed by the Adviser or its affiliates. As a result, they may have obligations to investors in those entities, the fulfillment of which might not be in the best interests of the Fund or its shareholders. Additionally, certain personnel of the Adviser and its management may face conflicts in their time management and commitments. See "Conflicts of Interest" for an additional discussion of the types of conflicts of interest to which the operations of the Fund may be subject.

Potential Conflicts of Interest Risk—Lack of Information Barriers

By reason of the various activities of the Adviser and its affiliates, the Adviser and such affiliates may acquire confidential or material non-public information or otherwise be restricted from purchasing certain potential Fund investments that otherwise might have been purchased or be restricted from selling certain Fund investments that might otherwise have been sold at the time. See "Conflicts of Interest" for an additional discussion of the types of conflicts of interest to which the operations of the Fund may be subject.

Limitations on Transactions with Affiliates Risk

The Investment Company Act limits the Fund’s ability to enter into certain transactions with certain of its affiliates. As a result of these restrictions, the Fund may be prohibited from buying or selling any security directly from or to any portfolio company of a registered investment company or private equity fund managed by Ares or any of its affiliates. The Investment Company Act also prohibits certain "joint" transactions with certain of the Fund’s affiliates, which could include investments in the same portfolio company (whether at the same or different times). These limitations may limit the scope of investment opportunities that would otherwise be available to the Fund.

Non-Diversification Risk

The Fund is classified as "non-diversified" under the Investment Company Act. As a result, it can invest a greater portion of its assets in obligations of a single issuer than a "diversified" fund. The Fund may therefore be more susceptible than a diversified fund to being adversely affected by any single corporate, economic, political or regulatory occurrence. The Fund intends to qualify for the special tax treatment available to RICs under Subchapter M of the Code, and thus intends to satisfy the diversification requirements applicable to RICs. Shareholders should refer to the "Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations" section of this prospectus for a description of such requirements.

Risks Associated with Fund Distribution Policy

The Fund intends to make regular distributions. Currently, in order to maintain a relatively stable level of distributions, the Fund may pay out less than all of its net investment income to the extent consistent with maintaining its status as a "regulated investment company" under the Code, pay out undistributed income from prior months, return capital in addition to current period net investment income or borrow money to fund distributions. The distributions for any full or partial fiscal year might not be made in equal amounts, and one distribution may be larger than the other. The Fund will make a distribution only if authorized by the Board of Directors and declared by the Fund out of assets legally available for these distributions. This distribution policy may, under certain circumstances, have certain adverse consequences to the Fund and its shareholders because it may result in a return of capital, which would reduce the Fund’s net asset value and, over time, potentially increase the Fund’s expense ratio. If a distribution constitutes a return of capital, it means that the Fund is returning to shareholders a portion of their investment rather than making a distribution that is funded from the Fund’s earned income or other profits. The Fund’s distribution policy may be changed at any time by the Board of Directors.

If the Fund elects to issue preferred shares and/or notes or other forms of indebtedness, its ability to make distributions to its common shareholders will be limited by the asset coverage requirements and other limitations imposed by the Investment Company Act and the terms of the Fund’s preferred shares, notes or other indebtedness.

Inadequate Return Risk

No assurance can be given that the returns on the Fund’s investments will be commensurate with the risk of investment in the Fund’s common shares.

Sourcing of Suitable Assets Risk

No assurance can be given the Adviser will be able to find enough appropriate investments that meet the Fund’s investment criteria.

Dilutive Effect of Receiving Cash Distributions Rather than Reinvesting Risk

Investors in the Fund will automatically participate in the Fund’s dividend reinvestment plan unless they affirmatively elect to "opt out" of the plan. All dividends declared in cash payable to shareholders that are participants in the Fund’s dividend reinvestment plan are generally automatically reinvested in common shares. As a result, shareholders that do not participate in the dividend reinvestment plan may experience dilution over time to the extent participants in the plan receive such common shares at a price below net asset value.

Closed-End Structure; Market Discount from Net Asset Value Risk

Shares of closed-end investment companies that trade in a secondary market frequently trade at market prices that are lower than their net asset values. This is commonly referred to as "trading at a discount". This risk may be greater for investors expecting to sell their shares in a relatively short period after completion of the public offering. As a result, the Fund is designed primarily for long-term investors. The Fund’s total assets will be reduced following this offering by the amount of offering and related expenses to be paid by the Fund.

Although the value of the Fund’s net assets is generally considered by market participants in determining whether to purchase or sell the Fund’s common shares, whether an investor will realize gains or losses upon the sale of the Fund’s common shares will depend entirely upon whether the market price of the Fund’s common shares at the time of sale is above or below the investor’s purchase price for the Fund’s common shares. Because the market price of the Fund’s common shares will be determined by factors such as relative supply of and demand for the Fund’s common shares in the market, general market and economic conditions, and other factors beyond the control of the Fund, the Fund cannot predict whether the Fund’s common shares will trade at, below or above net asset value or at, below or above the initial public offering price. The net asset value of the Fund’s common shares, however, is expected to be reduced immediately following the initial public offering as a result of the payment of offering costs. As with any security, complete loss of investment is possible.

Takeover Provisions Risk

The Fund’s charter and bylaws contain provisions that may delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might otherwise be in the best interests of the shareholders. Such provisions may discourage outside parties from seeking control of the Fund or seeking to change the composition of its Board of Directors, which could result in shareholders not having the opportunity to realize a price greater than the current market price for their shares at some time in the future.

The Fund’s charter classifies the Fund’s directors into three classes, serving staggered three-year terms, effective upon completion of this offering, and authorizes the Board of Directors to authorize the Fund to issue additional common shares. The Board of Directors also may classify or reclassify any unissued common shares into one or more classes or series of stock, including preferred stock, may set the terms of each class or series and may authorize the Fund to issue the newly classified or reclassified shares. The Board of Directors may, without any action by the Fund’s shareholders, amend the Fund’s charter from time to time to increase or decrease the aggregate number of shares of stock or the number of shares of stock of any class or series that the Fund has the authority to issue. The Fund’s bylaws require shareholders who wish to nominate individuals for election as directors or propose other business at meetings of shareholders to satisfy various requirements in order to do so, including a requirement to provide advance notice of such nomination or other business within the time period specified in the bylaws accompanied by the information and other specified materials. The bylaws also require that such information be updated.

Risk of Failure to Qualify as a RIC

Although the Fund intends to elect to be treated as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code, no assurance can be given that the Fund will be able to qualify for and maintain RIC status. If the Fund qualifies as a RIC under the Code, the Fund generally will not be required to pay corporate level federal income taxes on its income and capital gains that are timely distributed (or deemed distributed) to its shareholders. To qualify as a RIC under the Code and to be relieved of federal taxes on income and gains distributed to the Fund’s shareholders, the Fund must, among other things, meet certain source-of-income, asset diversification and distribution requirements. The distribution requirement for a RIC is satisfied if the Fund distributes at least 90% of its net ordinary income and net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses, if any, to the Fund’s shareholders on an annual basis.

Risk of Recognition of ‘‘Phantom’’ Income

For U.S. federal income tax purposes, the Fund may be required to include in income certain amounts that the Fund has not yet received in cash, such as the accretion of "original issue discount" or "market discount". This may arise if the Fund purchases assets that were issued at a discount or in certain other circumstances. The Fund may be required to include in income certain other amounts that it will not receive in cash. In these cases, the Fund may have difficulty meeting the requirement to distribute at least 90% of the Fund’s net ordinary income and net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses, if any, to qualify for the tax benefits available to RICs. To satisfy this distribution requirement, the Fund may have to sell some investments at times and/or at prices the Fund would not consider advantageous, raise additional debt or equity capital or reduce new investment originations and sourcings. If the Fund is not able to obtain such cash from other sources, the Fund may fail to qualify for the tax benefits available to RICs and thus be subject to corporate-level income tax. Please refer to the "Material U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations" section in this prospectus.